eXTReMe Tracker
Sep 302012
 

There is a compose functionality out there:

Linux umlaut typing

For the Gnome Desktop:

  • go to System -> Preferences -> Hardware -> Keyboard on the Gnome menu
  • select the Layouts tab
  • click the Options… button
  • expand Compose key position
  • check the box Right Ctrl is Compose or Right Win-key is Compose

The Right Ctrl or the Right Win key are now a “compose key”. With it you can compose symbols by combining two characters. The double-quote then the letter “a” equals an umlaut-a (ä). Tap the compose key, then tap shift+quote for a double-quote, then tap the a-key.

  • ä is compose, then “, then a
  • ö is compose, then “, then o
  • ü is compose, then “, then u
  • ß is compose, then s, then s

The list of compose key sequences can be found at:

Compose key sequences

Content found at blog: http://idolinux.blogspot.com/

Kül

 

Sep 192011
 

The latest version of Ubuntu is heavily based upon Unity environment. Unfortunately Unity has no track record of playing nice with existing gnome programs. For network applications such as VNC, Unity crashes the program with whole bunch of errors. These crashes are observed occasionally in the Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal) release, and most certainly in the latest beta 1 release of Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot).

If you have gotten comfortable with Ubuntu and want to continue using Gnome as the main environment, you can do so by using Linux Mint 11 (Katya). It has the same repositories as Ubuntu and you can even use the ubuntu-restricted-extras and build-essential packages which lets you obtain some of the fonts, codecs and libraries that Ubuntu fetches for you.

Ubuntu is starting to put more emphasis on making their release into an eye-candy, at the cost of reduced functionality. Having used Ubuntu since Dapper Drake days, its sad to ditch it for another distro. IMO Ubuntu 10.04 was the cleanest distro they put out – things have been going downhill after that. Linux Mint on the other hand picked up at the point when Ubuntu started to go dysfunctional. It has everything that Ubuntu should have been. There isn’t much to write about Mint 11. Its very similar to Ubuntu 10.04, has a newer kernel 2.6.38.xx, clean graphics, and the same repositories as Ubuntu. The transition is very easy, and things look a lot more neater in Mint.

To recap: If you are currently using Ubuntu and are afraid to upgrade to the 11.10 release, your fear is quite justified. Make a backup of your /home folder and go for a clean install of Linux Mint instead. I moved to Mint about a month ago and have had a rather smooth sailing so far.

Oct 262009
 

Its not quite obvious how to change the default size of gnome-terminal from the gconf-editor menu. The terminal itself is a subset of xterm. Gnome-terminal is an xterm emulator, and it follows a termcap file for this.

On gnome based distributions (Fedora/SUSE/Debian/Ubuntu etc.) do the following:

sudo gedit /usr/share/vte/termcap/xterm

There’s a lot of stuff in this file you probably don’t want to touch, but you can change the line that describes the terminal geometry:

xterm-xfree86|xterm-new|xterm terminal emulator (XFree86):\
:am:km:mi:ms:xn:\
:co#80:it#8:li#24:\

:co#80 specifies 80 columns, and li#24 specifies 24 lines. Change this to 100 and 30 or whatever you want.

:co#100:it#8:li#30:\

Now all terminals should open for this default size.

Adopted from a post on Fedora Forums.